Being a Member of the Board in a Community Association

A Beginner's guide

Key Terms

Board of Directors

commonly referred to as "the board," the board of directors are charged with the conduct and management of the community.  

The Declaration - 

essentially a contract between the association and owners, it outlines an owner's responsibilities to the association, such as payment of dues and assessments. The declaration is sometimes referred to as the "master deed," "documents," or "declaration of covenants, conditions, and restrictions," (CC&Rs)

Bylaws

a set of rules or guidelines regarding the operation of the board of directors that generally defines offices and communities involved with the successful operation of the association.

Governing Documents

the declaration, bylaws, operating rules, articles of incorporation or any other documents that govern the normal operating procedures of an association.

Ordinances

an individual or set of laws adopted by local government at the county and city level

Quorum

the minimum number of members required to hold an official meeting of the association; varies according to the association's governing documents.

Recuse - 

to temporarily remove or disallow an association board member from participating in a particular vote or proceeding because of a possible conflict of interest.

Common Area - 

any area of improved property intended for shared us by the members of the association 

​You've been elected to serve on the board of directors in your community?

 

Nice, and congratulations!

 

The board of directors are largely responsible for well run, beautifully maintained communities and are often proud contributors to the well-being of the neighborhood.

 

A position on the board of directors can be a challenging and rewarding duty.

 

It won't be all fun and games.

 

There will be a lot of necessary blood, sweat and tears to pull it off.

 

In fact, it may seem like a rather daunting task at first;

the fate of the association resting in your hands.

  

It will be hard work, but we're here to guide you through.

 

This is your beginner's guide to being a member of the board in a community association.

 

 

Community Associations

 

Before we get into the nitty-gritty of serving on the board, it's pertinent to first briefly touch on what a community association is.

 

Certain communities are comprised of deed-restricted properties and at the heart of these communities is the community association. 

 

A community association is a nongovernmental association of participating members of a community, i.e. neighborhood, village, condominium, cooperative, or group of homeowners. 

 

The community association is typically a non-profit corporation that serves the unit owners within the community with various amenities, such as: landscaping, general upkeep and maintenance of parking lots, clubhouses, pools and common areas.

 

Upon purchasing a property within a deed-restricted subdivision, the owner is required to pay assessments to, and abide the rules of, the community association. 

 

In return, the owner is permitted access to the community's amenities and has the opportunity to participate in the governance of the community. 

 

Read more about different types of associations

 

The rules and guidelines of a community association are outlined in various documents. 

 

The declaration, sometimes referred to as the "master deed," or "declaration of covenants, conditions, and restrictions," (CC&Rs) describes an owner's responsibilities to the association, as well as the association's duties to an owner.

 

It is commonly considered to be somewhat of the "constitution" of an association. 

 

Read more about community association legal documents

 

 

 

The Board of Directors

 

In order to effectively serve on the board of directors, it is crucial to understand who they are and what they do. 

 

In relation to a formal organization, community, homeowners' association, or condominium association, the board of directors is responsible for managing the conduct and affairs of the community. 

 

The board is initially composed of members that have been appointed by the property developer to maintain the character of the community they have designed. 

 

As ownership in the community transitions from developers to owners, the members of the board also transitions accordingly; with fewer developer-appointed members and more owners serving on the board of directors.

 

Ultimately, the board of directors will be solely comprised of unit owners elected by members within the association.

 

In a nutshell, the board of directors are responsible for the management and affairs of the community. 

 

They monitor the day-to-day operations within the community, 

 

As with any formal organization, there are a few key positions within the board of directors: President, Vice-President, Treasurer and Secretary.

 

 

The President of the Board of Directors

 

The President of the board of directors in a community association oversees, handles and leads the board and community meetings, as well as being responsible for many of the procedural duties. 

 

To be successful in this role, the president must be well-versed in all of the association's legal documents. 

 

Date

NOTE: PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

 

YOUR USE OF THIS WEB SITE OR ITS FACILITIES CONSTITUTES YOUR ACCEPTANCE OF THE TERMS OF USE AND PRIVACY POLICY

NOTE: PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

 

YOUR USE OF THIS WEB SITE OR ITS FACILITIES CONSTITUTES YOUR ACCEPTANCE OF THE TERMS OF USE AND PRIVACY POLICY. 

Contact Us: (407) 841-6555

Info@larsenandassociates.com